American’s Got Talent

Crossmember designed for universal application

Words and Photos by Cam Banty

In the past, transmission crossmembers were not very flexible. Most of the time, they were a one shot deal with no room for adjustment, unless you fabricated a new one or slotted the original factory holes. Classic Corvette C2 crossmembers were the worst, since they were welded to the frame with adjacent holes that served as a pass-through for the exhaust. That was really not very nice of those Corvette engineers when you think about it.

American Powertrain

This is the basic kit, available in three sizes to bridge an assortment of frame gaps. The included frame mount plates are very versatile and made from the same 6061 T6 aluminum.

In the world of universal aftermarket components, few automotive parts have the adaptability we found with American Powertrain’s universal aluminum adjustable crossmember. For custom builders looking to provide support for their transmission, automatic or manual, this is certainly the best solution we’ve seen. The X-Factor Stretch not only allows you to adjust for the proper point in the trans, front to back, but also allows for creating the proper angle of the driveshaft within the vehicle (up and down), which promotes proper U-joint health (sounds like a tooth paste ad, but it’s really important.)

The X-Factor Stretch Crossmember comes in three sizes, allowing it to bridge 20- to 26-inch, 26- to 32-inch, and 32- to 34-inch frame rail gaps. The crossmember comes with assorted brackets that connect to the frame, as well. Each bracket is slotted to allow for maximum adjustability, so for racers who might change to different transmissions, this system is more than compatible.

Built from hot-pressed T-6061 aluminum and powder coated in metallic silver, the unit delivers a great functional look. Steel end supports and Grade 8 hardware make it more than strong, but still light enough for racing applications.

In our install, we were faced with a number of real problems, not the least of which were custom pre-welded plates that jutted from our frame. We slightly modified the mounting plates (not necessary in just about all other situations) to clear these obstructions and bolted up the Rockland Tranzilla six-speed without issue.

It’s a thing of beauty. All of our judges agree!

Sources: American Powertrain, americanpowertrain.com

About Cam Benty - PPN Editor

Cam Benty’s name is instantly recognizable to those that have been around the automotive aftermarket over the last 25 years. He has built a stellar reputation as a well-rounded automotive journalist while holding positions with Popular Hot Rodding, Car Craft, National Dragster and Motor Trend.